Booking Photo Shoots - Six Things to Consider | The Typeface Group

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Six things to consider when booking photo shoots for your business

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Author

Grace Jeffreys

Booking photo shoots can be a daunting process when you are not sure what you are doing or if you have had a poor experience in the past. As seasoned corporate and event photographers, we know what the pitfalls are.

In this blog, we give you the six areas that you need to look at when booking photo shoots for your business.

1. Venue

Not every office has a space which is ideal for photography. From poor lighting to private data being on show, often the best thing to do is to clear an area or book another venue which is photo shoot ready. Otherwise, you will be scrambling around the day before, or on the day itself, to get everyone to clear their desks, rub down the whiteboards etc. This could still even result in finding out that the space isn’t ideal for photography for a long list of other reasons anyway.

TIP: The more natural light, the better when it comes to look for a venue for booking photo shoots. No one wants their head shots or professional corporate photos to look like they are in a cave. Unless you are selling cave excursions, of course!

2. People

When booking photo shoots, make sure everyone you need to be there knows that it is happening and that they turn up on the day, suited and booted. It is, of course, important to ensure that key team members are there. But, you may also want to have some happy customers on hand to build up your image library – as long as they have given their permission to be photographed, especially any children. People tell your company’s story and make corporate photos come alive. So, make the most of anyone willing to be involved in your photo shoot.

TIP: Give everyone ideas of what to wear on the day. We recommend block colours over patterns. If you want your staff to try and have an accent of your brand colours, provide props such as belts, pocket squares, ties, stationary or socks!

3. Props

With all the equipment that a photographer has to bring, props will not be on their list. From specific chairs, background paintings and mirrors, stationary and plants, make sure you know what you want to have in the photos and have it ready on the day.

TIP: When booking photo shoots with clients, we routinely start a private Pinterest board for them to pin the images that they like. This helps to collate the required props and gives the photographer an idea of the style to aim for. This then translates into a running order of shots to get on the day to ensure that you get all the photos you need in one hit.

4. Style

The images taken should represent how you want your brand and business to be perceived across all of your marketing channels. So, whilst you may like the photographic style of other businesses, does that really and uniquely represent you?  A decent corporate photographer will send you a briefing document for you to complete so that they know what you’re looking for ahead of the photo shoot itself. This briefing document can also be referred to during the shoot itself as well as at the editing stage. So, make sure that you complete it as thoroughly as possible.

TIP: Go back to the basics. Know your brand. Having a clear brand identity is key to knowing what photos you want and the style that would work alongside your messaging. What five words describe your brand that can translate into images? Make sure they are included in your briefing document so everyone is on the same page when snapping away.

5. Time

Photo shoots can take longer than you think. Setting up shots, ensuring that everyone is ready, capturing a shot – especially with camera shy people, adding/changing/removing light, getting feedback on how the photos look, getting different angles and more takes time.

A good rule of thumb is that each photo takes three – five minutes, including editing. Use that as a guide when you are booking photo shoots based on how many photos you need, the time required for the shoot and your budget.

TIP: Be prepared to stick to the shot list to get the most out of your session. Have one or two people from the business on hand to help to ensure that people are ready and shots have the props they need.

6. The edit

The photos have been taken with minimal fuss. YAY. Now, it is all in the edit. Understandably, the more photos you have then the longer it takes to edit them.

However, within five working days you should receive a select few to show you the style of the edit and to provide an opportunity to give feedback. Before you say ‘love them, crack on’, take a couple of days to properly look at them closely. Are you happy with the brightness? Or, are they too dark? Do they hit the brief?

TIP: This is when the detail in the brief is essential. A photographer can only bring to life the vision which you have explained. A decent brief and a collection of images which you like the style of are key.

If you are ready to book a photo shoot for your business and want to enquire about our services please do get in touch

Or complete an initial mini brief and our photography team will get in touch.

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